Darkness and Light

Yesterday was my birthday. Every four years I receive an early birthday present in the form of the inauguration of a president of the USA. Sometimes this is an encouraging present, sometimes – like this year – not so much.

I pray for President Trump. I pray for peace in his heart that will translate into a peacemaking approach to his policies at home and abroad. What I write now is based on the evidence of his words and actions up to now.

As I listened to Trump’s inauguration speech I was disturbed by what I heard. There were a handful of sentences that sounded like nod towards an inclusive society, but mostly it was a continuation of his consistent attitude over the last year, and apparently over his whole lifetime.

This was the point where his speech turned from objectionable to painful:

From this day forward, a new vision will govern our land. From this day forward, it’s going to be only America first, America first. Every decision on trade, on taxes, on immigration, on foreign affairs will be made to benefit American workers and American families.

This is the same attitude we see gaining traction all over the world these days – isolationism, protectionism and nationalism based on ignorance and fear. A nation is a collection of people who have been born or raised in an arbitrary area of land, and no such collection of people is any better or worse than another. Throughout history the wealth of nations has increased through cooperation and friendship, and the poor have been raised up through the generosity and compassion of the rich. These are the mechanisms by which societies advance and they are driven by the engine of love. When people turn their backs on their neighbours, either at home or abroad, everybody loses.

I want God to bless America. And I want Him to bless the United Kingdom. But I also want Him to bless Russia, and China and North Korea, and every other nation on Earth. And this is not a fantasy. The receipt of God’s blessings is not a zero-sum game.

We are the light of the world, we are the salt of the earth. Let us continue to shine the light of truth and love on all of our neighbours in every corner of the world. No matter how dark the world may become, the darkness will never overcome the light.

Unprovable God

I enjoy reading articles on ChurchLeaders.com. I don’t always agree with them, indeed there have been a few that I would question strongly, but in general they are helpful in getting me to look at my faith and my life in ways I wouldn’t otherwise.

I was very excited when I saw that a recent article was titled “Why God Does Not Want To Be Proven.” I was excited because I’ve been feeling so frustrated recently when reading the public comments attached to various news stories related to Christianity. I’m sure I’m not alone in this. Take the recent announcement of the new Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby. The constant flow of mocking comments from atheists can be disheartening. Many will refer to the ‘victory’ of science over faith. Of course, nobody has ever proved that God does not exist, but they can counter that with similar tales of Flying Spaghetti Monsters etc. How I wish that I could just prove to them what I know of God.

Well, Matt Appling’s article makes some good points, and some not so good. I’ll let you make your own judgements on it. But as I read it, a clear message came to me, which wasn’t actually mentioned in the article, so I’ll state it here:

God doesn’t want to be proven because He loves us.

I’d better explain. I find one of the most persuasive arguments for why God allows people to do evil things, is that He loves us enough to give us the choice of whether to follow Him or not. I believe strongly that if we didn’t have that freedom – if God really was the Almighty Puppet Master – that there would be no purpose to our lives. It is only by having an option of doing wrong, that doing right has any merit, and can bring us real joy.

In a similar way, if God was to make Himself known to the world in a way that would convince the most hardened atheist – whether it be by regally floating above our heads, or by reversing time like Superman – then there would suddenly be no room for faith, and the choice of believing in Christ and serving Him as our Lord and Master would lose most of its meaning.

There’s a big part of me that wishes it were so in any case, so billions of people could see the wonderful glory of God for themselves and become part of His family. But that’s not the way He has chosen to work His plan in these days. There was a time when He was intervening regularly with the Israelites (for example, Exodus 12). There was a time when He walked among us as a Man (John 1:14-18). And since then His Spirit has moved among us, connecting to those of us who reach for Him (John 14:15-18).

He will come again, and He will be unmistakeable (Matthew 24:29-31). The proof I want atheists to see is also evident all around us right now (Romans 1:18-23).

I’ll continue to state my case for God, by logic and by my testimony, whenever it can serve a purpose, but I think I’ll have to take a more relaxed approach to the militant and mocking atheists. It’s not my arguments that will change their minds. It’s only their own choice to open their minds to a new possibility and allow the Holy Spirit to work in them that will save them. And if I can help anyone through any part of that process then I will thank God for the privilege of doing so, as I thank Him now for giving me the freedom to choose life in Jesus Christ.